Trouble with Trail Cams

by Sep 3, 2012Uncategorized

Trouble with Trail Cams

I need some advice. Dad and I have 3 trail cameras that are spread throughout our hunting grounds. In the past, we have seen photos like this:

But now, we are getting photos of the trees. We have tweaked the timing so they are set for 15 seconds between photos. We have them where the deer are (as evidence by the tracks) but no photos of deer. We have them in the same spots we did at some point last year when we got the above photos. So…

What are we doing wrong???

7 Comments

  1. I think we've all been there, walking up to your cam, getting excited because it says there are 125 pics on it and they're all trees!
    my theory is something moving through fast like a bird or squirrel(sp?) setting off the cam…I hate it, because mine will take 3 pics when triggered so then i get three times the nothing. if it is an internal issue i can't help, but something i did try was setting it back as far as the sensor would work to widen the view of the deer path…i'd get more "heads" and "butts" if they were moving, but at least i could pattern their movement.

  2. Our first camera has a great sensor that shoots a laser beam so we knew what we were covering. The two newest ones have a weak circle that we try to see what the coverage is. Still, no real deer photos.

    I had the BEST conversation with a custom service guy for Moultrie.
    Me: My camera takes photos that look washed out
    Guy: Okaaaay… so, you need to put your camera so its not facing the sun, okay??
    Me: Yeah, its not facing the sun
    Guy: hmmm…okaaay… so lets try something, okay?

    He walked me through rebooting the camera and at the end of every sentence said "okay??" at first it was condescending but I quickly realized he has NO idea how the cameras are actually USED in the woods so it became an amusing conversation

  3. We all have a pile of 'those' pictures, what Steve and I have done is set the cameras to be less sensitive and go on a burst of three. The less sensititve allows birds, squirrels, etc to go by quickly and not get shot, while the three bursts allows something to be seen that is taking its time coming in. Also less sensitivity ensures that changing light conditions and/or wind does not activate the camera.
    Not sure this helps, but it how we have more pics of deer in our area.

  4. I also found the if a twig or bush is moving in the wind it will trigger and if it is facing the sun rise or sun set that will also set them off sometimes.

  5. I agree with all of the above comments especially reset your camera fully, set it back from moving twigs. Three shot bursts, less sensitivity, fresh batteries, and clean all your sensors every time you check the camera.

  6. I can not thank all of you enough for the great suggestions!!!

  7. Your camera is aimed too high. It is exposing for the bright sky thus the dark day pictures, And the last picture is normal. It's known as a transition picture. The IR filter has come down for the night pictures.

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Erin Merrill, author of And a Strong Cup of Coffee, is president of Women of the Maine Outdoors, a senior writer for Drury Outdoors, a contributor to the Northwoods Sporting Journal and passionate all things Maine, Hunting, and the Outdoors.

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